Tag Archives: gum disease

September is National Gum Care Month

gum care.

It’s National Gum Care Month. Let’s a moment to talk about why it’s so important to take care of your gums.

Gum disease affects almost half of adults over age 30 and approximately 70 percent of adults over age 65. The first stage of gum disease is called gingivitis, an inflammation of the gums. With gingivitis, gums can be red and puffy, and bleed easily when brushing or flossing. If gingivitis is not treated, it can progress to periodontitis, where the structures supporting the teeth, including the bone, begin to break down and be lost. Advanced stages of gum disease can lead to tooth loss and general health problems.

The good news is that gum disease is treatable — and early gum disease is even reversible. So what can you do to take care of your gums?

  • Be diligent about your oral hygiene routine at home: Your first line of defense is your oral hygiene routine at home. Brush your teeth gently morning and night, using a soft toothbrush and fluoride toothpaste. Brushing too vigorously can harm your gums and cause them to recede. It is also important to floss every day to dislodge plaque that can build up between the teeth and around the gum line.
  • Come in for professional dental cleanings and exams: Schedule regular professional cleanings to remove the plaque that is hard to reach. If plaque is not removed, it can harden to form tartar (or “calculus”). Only professional cleanings with special dental tools can remove tartar. When plaque and tartar form below the gum line, your bone that supports the teeth may be at risk. We can examine your mouth above and below the gum line to detect and monitor any signs of gum disease and recommend appropriate treatments.

We are always happy to talk with you about how to maintain the health of your gums. Remember that early gum disease is very treatable, so take care of your gums, and they’ll take care of you!

If you would like more information about gum health, please contact us by calling (815) 741-1700 for a consultation.

Keeping Gum Disease at Bay Could Help Your Overall Health

oral health.

It’s bad enough the diseases caused by poor dental hygiene or lack of dental checkups could be leaving your teeth and gums more at risk. But current scientific research seems to indicate those same dental diseases may also cause you problems in other parts of your body.

The connection is especially pronounced with periodontal (gum) disease, a family of disorders that can eventually lead to tooth loss. Gum disease is caused by plaque, a thin film of bacteria and food particles that builds up on tooth surfaces due to a lack of daily brushing and flossing. Even skipping one day of hygiene increases the level of oral bacteria that cause these infections.

As it spreads, the infection causes the gum tissues to become inflamed and ulcerated. The gums weaken to the point where they easily bleed even when mildly brushed. This allows access for bacteria and other toxins to enter the bloodstream where they may eventually affect other organ systems. We’re now finding that conditions as varied as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis (which all share a common thread with inflammation) may be affected by gum disease — and vice-versa.

If you have any of these or similar conditions, it’s important for you to stay vigilant in maintaining healthy teeth and gums. It’s necessary to brush and floss daily to remove plaque buildup as well as dental checkups at least twice a year. You should also keep a close eye out for early signs of gum disease, like bleeding, swollen or reddened gums. If so, call us for an appointment as soon as possible.

Keeping your teeth and gums disease-free and healthy could have a positive impact on your treatment for other health conditions. You’ll be doing your mouth and the rest of your health a favor.

If you would like more information on how periodontal (gum) disease affects the body, please contact us by calling (815) 741-1700 for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Good Oral Health Leads to Better Health Overall.”

Bleeding Gums may be a Warning Sign of Gum Disease

gum disease.

If your gums bleed when you brush your teeth, it’s unlikely the cause is brushing too hard. The more common reason (especially if you’re experiencing little to no pain) is periodontal (gum) disease caused by the accumulation of bacterial deposits known as dental plaque and calculus where your teeth and gums meet.

This bacterial dental plaque results in an infection in the soft tissues of the gum; the body responds to this infection with antibodies, which in turn cause the gums to become swollen, or inflamed. As this biological “war” rages on, both the infection and inflammation become chronic. The tissues are weakened from this disease process and bleed easily.

Bleeding gums, then, is an important warning sign of possible gum disease. As the infection progresses the normal attachment between the teeth and gums begins to break down and form pockets in the void. The infection will continue within these pockets, eventually spreading deeper into the gums and bone. The gum tissue may begin to recede, resulting in bone loss and, if untreated, to tooth loss.

In the early stages of the disease, bleeding gums could be the only symptom you notice. It’s possible the bleeding may eventually stop, but this doesn’t mean the disease has, and is more likely advancing. If you’ve encountered bleeding gums, you should visit us as soon as possible for a complete examination.

There’s a two-pronged approach for treating gum disease. The first prong — and top priority — is to remove as much of the offending bacterial plaque and harder deposits (calculus) as possible, along with the possibility of follow-up antibacterial and antibiotic treatment. This may require more than one session, but it’s necessary in stopping the disease. The second prong is instituting proper oral hygiene: daily brushing and flossing (using proper techniques we can teach you) and semi-annual professional cleanings in our office to remove any plaque or calculus not removed with brushing.

Bleeding gums is your body’s way of telling you something isn’t right with your gums. The sooner you seek diagnosis and treatment, the better your chances of halting the damage caused by the disease.

If you would like more information on bleeding gums as a warning sign of gum disease, please contact us by calling (815) 741-1700. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bleeding Gums.”

Prevention is the Key in the Fight Against Periodontal Disease

brushing.

Billions of bacteria live in each of our mouths, sharing a common environment with teeth and soft tissues. Most of the time, they coexist in symbiotic balance. But sometimes that balance becomes disrupted, leading to a destructive condition known as periodontal disease.

From the Latin peri (“around”) and the Greek odont (“tooth”), periodontal refers to the tissues that are around the teeth. When they become diseased, it’s a serious matter; and not just because of potential tooth loss — there is evidence that periodontal disease has links to cardiovascular disease and, for pregnant women, low birth weights in pre-term babies.

There are a number of factors that can increase your risk of developing periodontal disease, like smoking, poor nutrition, and your systemic health. The biggest factor, however, is increased bacterial plaque due to poor oral hygiene practices.

Periodontal disease is progressive. As unhealthy bacteria levels increase, the bacteria eventually cause bone loss, the gums separate from the teeth and create what is referred to as periodontal pockets. As the pockets deepen around the teeth, plaque and tartar become extremely difficult to remove, even if you resume a proper hygiene routine. At this stage, treating the disease will require a different approach. And if left untreated, the teeth will most likely continue to lose bone and eventually be lost.

Through a dental exam, we can determine the presence and extent of the disease and recommend a treatment strategy. Besides lifestyle changes and better hygiene habits, this strategy might also include treatment with antibiotics, a thorough mechanical cleaning to remove tartar and plaque, surgical techniques to remove infected tissue, or occlusal bite therapy.

Above all, prevention is the key. Through proper dental hygiene and regular dental exams and cleanings, stopping periodontal disease from beginning in the first place is your best defense.

If you would like more information on the treatment of periodontal disease, please contact us by calling (815) 741-1700. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Understanding Gum Disease.”

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Warning Signs of Gum Disease

gum disease.

Do you frequently experience bleeding gums during your daily brushing routine? You might assume that you are brushing too hard and that this bleeding is normal. However, you should know that any bleeding of gum tissue is abnormal and should be considered a potential sign of gum disease.

Gum tissues usually bleed because of dental plaque buildup from poor oral hygiene practices. When the plaque is left around the gum line for a long period of time, 24 hours or more, the gum tissues respond by becoming inflamed — this can quickly become a chronic inflammation.

Here are some other warning signs of gum disease:

  1. Bad Breath. Bad breath is one of the most common signs of gum disease. This is especially true for those who do not floss, because plaque collects in the protected areas between the teeth making them especially prone to gum inflammation. This plaque often produces a pungent smell that causes bad breath.
  2. Red or Sensitive Gums. If you look closely in the mirror, you might see redness of the gums. It may also seem as if your gums are swollen, and in more advanced cases, this can lead to receding gums. Finally, you might notice gum sensitivity when you brush or a sensitivity to hot and cold.
  3. Tooth Loss. If this disease goes untreated, over time, bone loss will cause loose teeth, movement or migration of the teeth into a new and unstable position, and ultimately tooth loss. The rate of progression will depend upon the type of gum disease that you have.
  4. Painful Gums. Once you start to feel acute pain and extremely sore gums, this may mean you have developed a periodontal abscess. When this happens, the bacteria are walled off inside a gum “pocket,” and since your body’s defenses are overwhelmed, there is a battle between the bacteria in that pocket and your body’s defense mechanisms. The result is a collection of pus and extra bone loss. Your gums will be sore, swollen, red and may even discharge pus.

As you can see, the further the disease progresses, the greater the amount of pain and damage that will occur. Gum disease is also link to heart health, click here  to learn how to reduce your health risks. Therefore, upon the first sign of gum disease, such as bleeding gums, you should schedule an appointment with us immediately.

If you would like more information about gum disease, please contact us by calling (815) 741-1700. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Warning Signs of Gum Disease.”